Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Micro Blogging Head 2 Head

I preformed a small experiment today on my micro services, if you will, (Twitter and Pownce). I posted a message on Twitter asking for suggestions for a blog post. I then realized I should ask everyone on Pownce as well. I figured someone would have a suggestion for me, and I would see which was more responsive.

As I predicted, I am yet to get a single response on Twitter. Now let me give some background:

I pretty much exclusively signed up for Twitter to use as a sidebar micro blogging service to supplement my main blog. The purpose was to fill in some blanks, especially when trying to do a weekly recap when I can only remember 12 hours of my recent past.

I started adding people, specifically from my podcast subscriptions . So 99% of my Twitter friends are part of the geek elite and have thousands of followers and have no clue who I am, much less what to ask me to write about.


To follow me on Twitter is to really, really care about what I eat, what I watch on TV, and my daily plans. I really appreciate those that do too!

I have gained some good friendships on Twitter, though, and I've continued to add more people that actually respond from time to time. I appreciate them taking the time to make my Twitter experience more fulfilling.

My experience was completely different on Pownce. Within 20 minutes I had my first response and my suggestion to post about my thoughts concerning the Twitter boom and compare it to Pownce. I was pleased greatly to have interaction and honest responses so quickly.

Now for some Pownce background:

I signed up for Pownce as soon as it was announced if not sooner. I got my invite in July and for the first month, mostly sent files back and forth to Jessi. She was always sending me LOLCat pics, and I'd forward mp3 files which is an awesome feature in Pownce, shhh!

I decided to follow the same path that I did on Twitter. I started to follow all of the big podcasters who did not know me from anyone else, much less had the time to read my little blog. I then also, just like Twitter, started adding people that were following those geek elites.

The only difference this time is that Pownce was more naturally designed strictly as a community and communication model, where Twitter, though simple, has endless variations. The people on Pownce are far more willing, in my opinion to have a conversation, than most in Twitter who are there to "toot their own horns."


So the moral this time is simple: Every service is different. Every service is completely customizable. The Pownce community for me wins this round hands down. It may or may not win hands down for everyone else.